Gunnhuver’s new Geysir – the waking witch?

IMG_9982

Well we’ve just about recovered from the awesome experience that was filming the eruption! We’ve got some fantastic footage from the ground, the night footage is unbelievable…but…you’ll have to wait until it airs (BBC2 and Animal Planet, next spring) to see it, sorry to those of you who have asked! So again a hearty thankyou to Thor and True North for getting us there and the SAR teams who are doing such a great job in keeping everyone safe out there.

We’ve had a great time over the past 10 days or so, all a bit varied and involving lots of dashing around the island, north, south, east and west we’ve done a whistlestop tour.

IMG_3829

IMG_3904

wpid-dsc_0326.jpg

IMG_3813

We started off doing some work in Reykjavik, and as usual we stayed at our favourite spot in town, the 1912 Guesthouse (http://www.1912guesthouse.is) It’s a lovely place, right next to the Parliament building. Clean, comfortable and reasonably priced The owner is quite a character too, full of good stories and extremely helpful, it’s a definite top recommendation from us!

IMG_3889

We were after filming some nightlife, clubs and urban material, largely to cut into a sequence on how Icelanders use the power that they generate (in a very green fashion) from the rich Geothermal sources under the ground.

(ED note – It also gave a us a great excuse to sample some of the nightlife for which Reykjavik is gathering a worldwide reputation).

L1026413

Many timelapses later, we got some great shots around the town so should make a dynamic little sequence! And of course it gave Ian a chance to express his monochrome skills as only he can, it never ceases to amaze me the talents of this man.

L1026449-Edit

L1026090-Edit-2

L1026033-Edit

We returned to the Big Laxa river as a guest again of Orri Vigfusson. As Ian was in Hornstrandir with the foxes when we came here last time (he hasn’t forgotten the fox blog btw, it is coming soon!) and he had the high speed camera with him, we needed to do some pick up shots of casting.

IMG_3862

Orri had arranged for David L. Goodman to be our casting star, and what a star he was! Not only was he a superb fisherman he was also a supremely elegant double handed caster. He is a devotee of the underhand cast (ed note this is a revolutionary method of fly casting, pioneered by the great Swedish angler Goran Andersson http://www.salmonfishing-norway.com/goran%20andersson%20biographie.htm)

983A9618

983A9613

To see David put this cast into practice was a wonderful experience, its such an elegant and precise way to fish and he was quite simply brilliant at it. As an added bonus, we caught and returned a lovely 20lb cock salmon and laughed….a lot. I have to say that David is one of the funniest and most entertaining contributors I have had the pleasure of working with. I wont repeat the stories told for lots of different reasons but I think its safe to say that we all learnt a few things! Of course you’ll have to wait and see the film to see him and Goran Andersson’ technique in action, but here is a shot of Ian giving it his best. A good job he did of it too, his usual dogged persistence paid dividend

IMG_3871

After a few more days back in town, some more interviews beckoned. Ester, Our fox scientist was kind enough to invite her to our lab and show us some of the new research she has been doing into the Arctic fox. Ester has been brilliant for the whole of this project, we couldn’t have done the filming in Hornstarndir without her.

IMG_3903

We also met a nice lady called Inga-Lisa and her daughter Asta, who were kind enough to talk to us about trolls and elves, and what they represent to everyday Icelanders.

We filmed them down to the sea stacks (or trolls petrified in the light of dawn) at Reykjanes, which we had recced back in May, a lovely spot down by the sea on this dramatic coastline.

IMG_3891

Very close by are the hot srings of Gunnhuver that we wrote about back in May (https://footstepsofgiantsblog.wordpress.com/2014/05/10/an-icelandic-ghost-story/) where according to local legend, the witch Gunn met her end by being tricked into a boiling mud pool, leaving her ghost to haunt this area to this day.

983A5798

In geological terms, these boiling, spitting mud pools are down to water coming into contact with hot rocks deep below, boiling and liquefying mud, then forcing its way to the surface as mud springs. (ed note, there is actually one such example, a cool one, at Wooton Bassett in Wiltshire). Here at Gunnhuver they have been active for many years and the whole area is dotted with vents, drifting steam covers the area and creates quite an atmosphere. In the past few weeks there has been a marked increase in activity here, (perhaps related to the 20,000 earthquakes that have happened in Iceland in the last month!) with old mud springs becoming more vigourous and others dying down.

Im not sure anyone expected a new Geyser to form though!

IMG_3928

Now a geyser is a peculiar phenomenon that need very specific conditions to occur. Its basically a funnel going down through the ground to an area where water (and/or mud) meets the magma. When this water reaches boiling point (its held there under pressure from the water above, becoming superheated) a bubble of steam surges up through the funnel forcing the water and mud ahead of it to be shot up into the air (in the case of Icelands famous Geysir, about 30m up in the air, and 80m for Old Faithful in Yellowstone US) the cooler liquid then falls back into the chamber to be boiled and the process repeats on a regular, timeable basis. It’s a bit like boiling a kettle really.

983A5816

983A5970

Though Iceland has a handful of active geysers, (including the most famous one at Geysir, its where the name came from funnily enough) most are very small, and they are pretty rare worldwide (roughgly 1000)

983A5800

The biggest ever recorded was in New Zealand, the Waimangu Geyser, which got to heights of an incredible 460m , but that died out in 1904 http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/photograph/6497/waimangu-geyser-the-worlds-largest

Old faithful gets to 70m, and Strokkur (the active one next to Geysir) gets up to about 20 m. So any new geyser forming is a welcome addition to the list, particularly if it gets to any height.

983A5846

News broke on Tuesday 16th Sept that a geyser had been spotted out amongst the vents at Gunnhuver. We got staright in the trusty bus and got back out there on the Wednesday morning. Despite the rain it was pretty spectacular, a freshly formed mud hole some 6m across and 2m deep, surrounded by copious quantities of mud spatter, was bubbling away merrily. After a few minutes, the bubbling increased and with a roaring and hissing, great gouts of mud, steam and water shot up 8-10m into the air. The eruption only lasted about 20-30 seconds before dying away again, leaving the water pouring back down the hole to start the kettle boiling again. Now obviously a kettle needs time to boil, and as the saying goes “a watched pot never boils” but sure enough 10 mins later, off she went again! It seems that the witch Gunn has woken up, whether shes been dallying with her friends at Bardabunga we’ll have to leave to the spirits to decide, but its certainly a spectacle worth watching. One point to bear in mind here of course is that you must take great care when walking in this area. There are countless vents and mud holes all with scalding hot mud and water to trap the unwary, so if you don’t know where you should go, get a guide!

983A5913

With that, we set off east and north.

IMG_3938

IMG_3941

IMG_3933

983A6826

We are heading up there to film a horse roundup in the next week, but its always worth picking off a few shots on the way. As chance would have it, we bumped into our good chum and all round great mate wildlife cameraman Warwick Sloss who is over here pursuing his great love of stills photography (ed note – his stuff is well worth a look, sublime portraiture all done on analogue film, developed and hand printed by his good self, check out his website here http://www.slossphoto.co.uk)

photo

983A7860

Weather was pretty grim but we  caught up with the spectacular waterfall Dettifoss….

983A7824

and an off chance wildlife highlight was a lagoon on the southeast where many hundreds, perhaps thousands of whooper swans were gathering before their migration south.

983A6823

983A6891

983A6913

A sure sign that autumn, and the harsh winter, are on their way.

983A6846

Til next time…

One thought on “Gunnhuver’s new Geysir – the waking witch?

  1. Crystal M. Trulove

    Your story and your photos are so great. The photo of the geyser at the beginning is my fave. There is so much in this post I hardly know where to begin raving: your enthusiasm, goblins, witches… oh and the shot of David casting against a red sky – wow. The waterfall is incredible, the mural on the wall of the 1912 Guesthouse, the B&W photos. What a good time you must have had a what a good team to work with. So glad I stumbled accidentally into this and I’ll be looking for the documentary!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s